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  Scandinavian Crime Fiction in English
PLEASE NOTE: THIS SITE HAS MOVED. The content at this old site is not being updated. If you link to this site, please switch to the new address, http://scandicrimeproject.wordpress.com/

My thanks to Wordpress.com for hosting this content in a form that is much easier to keep updated.


Not too many years ago, it would have been hard to think of examples of Scandinavian crime fiction beyond the Martin Beck series and Smilla's Sense of Snow. Suddenly, readers are blessed with a deluge of choices. What has led to such a renaissance of crime fiction from a part of the world not known for its criminal tendencies?

Vit Wagner has two answers. One is simple enough: Hennning Mankell. The popularity of his Kurt Wallander series - both in Sweden and abroad - made publishers recognize that there was a vast market for other writers to tap. (To dig a little deeper, Bill Ott suggests that the fall of the Iron Curtain and the subsequent wave of immigration into the Scandinavian countries set up the tensions that drive Mankell's fiction and made it instantly accessible to audiences in the US.)

The other is bit more complicated. Wagner points to the 1986 assassination of Swedish Prime Minister Olof Palme, still unsolved. It left many emotionally fraught questions dangling; not just the relatively trivial "who did it?" but more complex ones about modern society and violence. According to author and critic Marie Peterson, the only literature that explored the impact of the assassination, felt deeply throughout Scandinavia, was crime fiction. As Peter Rozovsky has pointed out, Scandinavian writers are not so much interested in the solving of puzzles or the voyeuristic experience of crime, but rather in "the slow, rippling effect of a violent act on the minds, souls and social fabric of those they leave behind." In many ways, crime fiction has taken the place of the 19th century social novel, particularly in Scandinavia.

Whatever has led to this wealth of freshly-translated fiction, readers have plenty to choose from. Reading crime fiction can give the curious reader a feeling for Scandinavian culture, society, and landscapes. This Website and companion blog are intended to help the armchair traveler on their journeys. 

Entries are arranged by country. Each entry includes (when available) biographical information about the author, titles translated into English, links to Worldcat records for Swedish, UK, and US publications, translator's name, and a selection of reviews. (Please note - your library holdings may not be reflected in the Worldcat links, since not all libraries are included and libraries may own different editions of the same work. Be sure to check your own library catalog.) To the left you'll find a feed from blogs that pay particular attention to contemporary international crime fiction.

Start-up funding for this project was provided through a Research, Scholarship and Creativity grant from Gustavus Adolphus College. Thanks are also due to Karen Meek, whose Eurocrime Website was an invaluable resource and R. Guy Erwin
who kindly shared his extensive bibliography of Nordic mysteries with me.

Please feel free to contact the compiler - Barbara Fister - with any additions, corrections, or1 suggestions.
browse authors

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P R S T W Y 

Adler-Olsen, Jussi

Alvtegen, Karin

Arnaldur Indriðason

Árni þórarinsson

Bagge, Tapani

Birkegaard, Mikkel

Blædel, Sara

Blanche, August

Bodelsen, Anders

Bornemark, Kjell-Olof

Burman, Carina

Ceder, Camilla

Christensen, Lars Saabye

Dahl, Arne

Dahl, K. O.

Davidson, Leif

Davys, Tim


Edqvist, Dagmar

Edwardson, Åke

Egeland, Tom

Egholm, Elsebeth

Ekman, Kerstin

Ekström, Jan

Enger, Thomas

Eriksson, Kjell

Fagerholm, Monika

Fioretos, Aris

Friis, Agnete

Frimansson, Inger

Fossum, Karin

Gazan, Sissel-Jo

Gerhardsen, Carin

Grebe, Camilla & Åsa Träff

Griffiths, Ella

Grytten, Frode

Guillou, Jan

Hellstrom, Borge & Anders Roslund

Hjorth, Michael & Hans Rosenfeldt

Hoeg, Peter

Holt, Anne

Horst, Jørn Lier

Indriðason, see Arnaldur Indriðason

Jansson, Anna

Jansson, Tove

Joensuu, Matti Yrjänä

Juul, Pia

Jungersen, Christian

Jungstedt, Mari

 Kaaberbøl, Lene

Kallentoft, Mons

Kallifatides, Theodor

Kazinski, A. J.

Kepler, Lars

Kirstila, Pentti

Koppel, Hans

Läckberg Camilla

Lampi, Heimo

Lang, Maria

Lapidus, Jens

Larsen, Michael

Larsson, Åsa

Larsson, Bjorn

Larsson, Stieg

Lehtolainen, Leena

Liffner, Eva-Marie

Mankell, Henning

Markllund, Liza

Nesbø, Jo

Nesser, Håkan

Nielsen, Torben

Nykanen, Harri

Ohlsson, Kristina

Ørum, Poul

Östergren, Klas

Östlundh, Håkan

Persson, Leif G. W.

Peterzen, Elisabet

Riverton, Stein

Roslund, Anders, see Hellstrom, Borge & Anders Roslund

Rygg, Pernille

Sariola, Mauri

Sarvig, Ole

Scheen, Kjersti

Sigurðardóttir, see Yrsa Sigurðardóttir

Silbersky, Leif, see Svedilid, Olov & Leif Silbersky

Sipila, Jarkko

Sjöwall, Maj & Per Wahlöo

Staalesen, Gunnar

Svedilid, Olov & Leif Silbersky

Theorin, Johan

Thompson, James

Träff, Åsa see Grebe

Tursten, Helene

Wagner, Jan Costin

Wahlberg, Karin

Wahloo, Per see also Sjowall, Maj & Per Wahloo

Wallentin, Jan

Westö, Kjell

Yrsa Sigurðardóttir


Contact the compiler with suggestions, corrections, and additions